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that has helped expedite this thing with terrorism and their attacks on the united states? is it one person or many? who is responsible? >> i don't think there's a nickel's worth of difference between the two policies in terms of foreign policy. the first president bush, mr. clinton, the sec and mr. bush and mr. obama have made it their business to light to the american people, to insist we are being attacked because of what we think here in north america or how we lived rather than with united states government has done. the core of the problem is intervention in other people's business. part of that intervention is unfortunately necessary. we have to defend the saudis and operate because we depend on oil. our support of israel and our intervention in south sudan, the relentless intervention of the united states on issues that are not very important to it is because of what is going on and it is a bipartisan stimulus. it's not just one person. until we stop that war think about stopping at, there is no chance to stop this war and that is why so much about kite has spread so greatly since 2
different than the united states. >> i think it made segregation almost look like a civil affairs -- whereas in south africa it was an art, science, and something white students could study at universities. >> before we go to the break, you mentioned nelson mandela. you mentioned that the african national congress. how did you all come together, the two of you? >> i went to high school at the school bus was known much more for its left-leaning and trotsky ideology. so, my conversion to the african national congress came a lot more because i enjoyed the inclusive become of the focus on activism. i enjoyed the way in which it joyfully understood how it could take the struggle against apartheid, that while there was life and death of risks involved, we were still able to celebrate our humanity and not to give it up at all. so, in 1980, my great conversion to what we call congress politics, the politics of the african national congress, happened, but i remain ever thankful for the theoretical rigor i learned from the kind of trotsky movement which i emerged from. >> june 12 as a celebration as w
to the united states embassy, and he asked for release and guarantee of safe treatment but chen guangcheng said china threatened his family if he did not leave the embassy and the united states urged him to make a decision quickly and no he fears for his family's safety and want as asylum in america. he may get his wish with a visa to study not united states, what does this tell us about modern china and about obama's china policy? dramatic escape. he climbed over walls to escape house arrest, injured himself, is driven by heroic colleagues in the human rights community, 300 miles to beijing and stays in safe houses before they say he has to go to the embassy for safety. what does this episode toll us about china? >> during the cold war getting into the embassy gate would have been the happy ending but, now, it does not work out that way. what it tells us about china is contrary to the school of thought here is a country that is increasingly confident that it will be the second great power of the 21st century they are terrified of blind legal activistses living under house arrest in little vill
and the missouri both had several hundred years of contact with french traders by the time the united states came along. so there were people in the tribe that could read french extremely fluently. speak it, read it, whatever. so the letters that he sent out, he sent them in that language because it was pretty much a universal language at the time. the otos and the missouris were kind of a small tribe in that they had a lot of he enemies and so they were always looking for allies and resources. so when they came along, lewis and clark saw this as them notifying that the united states now owns this territory and you're under our control or whatever. the otos saw that as a very important and potentially powerful ally against their enemies. so this was important to them. and that's probably why they kept it. lewis and clark, they met with several oto leaders at that time. one was big ax and one was big horse. now, this is the certificate of friendship that was given to big ax. and you can see his name right here. >> what does this say? >> it basically just says that the man named big ax is a friend
second term as president of the united states. [cheers and applause] [chanting] >> now, governor romney is a patriotic american. he has raised a wonderful family, and he has much to be proud of. he runs a large financial firm, but i think he has learned the wrong lessons from these experiences. he sincerely believes that ceos and wealthy investors like him make money, the rest of us will automatically prosper well. when a woman in iowa shares the story of her financial struggles he responded with financial theory. he said hour productivity equals our income. let me tell you something, virginia, the problem with our economy is not that the american people aren't productive enough. you've never worked harder in your lives. you're working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now--the challenge we faced for over a decade is harder work and higher incomes. it's bigger profits have not led to better jobs. governor romney does not seem to get that. he doesn't seem to understand that maximizing profits by whatever means necessary, whether it's your layoffs, joys sourcing, union
guangcheng who the government now says can apply for a travel permit to go to the united states to study. before secretary of state, hillary clinton worked out this deal with the beijing government, mitt romney weighed in. here is what he said about the chen case. >> this is a dark day for freedom. and a day of shame for the obama administration. did governor romney overreact in the middle of the diplomatic crisis? >>guest: no, i don't think so. this crisis is a reminder of what we are dealing with in china. we hope there are reformers in the government pushing for a more open system but we know we are dealing with people that are paranoid and control freaks. and totalitarian system. they control everything from the words you can search on the internet to who visits this gentleman when he was in jail, i'm sorry, in the hospital. these are things that we are dealing with. second, there is a propensity thing has of unwillingness to force any assert america's values. tragically we saw that in 2009 during the green revolution in iran and we see that here now, in china, where somehow this adm
, the u.s. government and energy companies have both come to the conclusion that the united states is sitting on huge deposits of natural gas, far more than anyone guessed. enough to power cars and electrical plants and just about anything else for hundreds of years. in fact, the united states could become a net exporter of energy, which could reduce or even eliminate the trade deficit, and of course reduce our dependence on the middle east. now, that natural gas and some oil, too, is locked in shale rock. energy companies have figured out how to drill down, turn the bit sideways, and create tunnels deep within the earth, which are then pumped full of water, sand and chemicals, fracturing the rock and releasing the gas. this so-called fracking which is very controversial is happening all over the united states, most notably in north dakota. more recently, here in the monterey shale in california, home to some of the most vocal environmentalists in the world. chris falkner is ceo of blightling gas and shale. he claims the environmentalists have the upper hand in the argument over fr
to cater to the libertarians. we are only one-quarter of 1% of the 169 million voters in the united states. the voters are looking for help. they are losing their jobs. they cannot get employment. the cost of college is far beyond what anyone can pay for. they cannot go into bankruptcy. the homes of parents are being foreclosed upon because of student debt. the small business has been stifled. a long that idea of small business is where we should be focusing. that is where i am focused. my first business was at nine years old when i had a paper route. i am a high-school dropout. i went to harvard law school. i a magna cum laude from long island university and it was tough getting into high school when you are -- tough getting into harvard when you are a high-school dropout. i have been through a lot of hard knocks but i have been waiting on tables, short order cooks, setting up tents at the bowling alley, delivering bulk and learning how to carry 10 bottles into arms. i still work about 18 hours a day. i could not even be here because i had to go to bankruptcy court for a client on a criti
down what europe's crisis means for the united states, christine romans, host of "your bottom line" and christie freeland, editor for thomsons reuters digital. today they fired french president nicolas sarkozy. he will be replaced by socialist francois hollande. sarkozy becomes the highest profile european leader ousted during the region's economic crisis. cnn's senior european correspondent jim bittermann joins us live from paris. jim? >> reporter: you know how they say you should have been here a day ago. you should have been here an hour and 15 minutes ago. this place was packed with sar k cozy supporters thinking he had a chance to win and he didn't win. he conceded defeat almost immediately when the numbers came from the television networks across the country, the exit polls. here is a little bit of the concession speech he gave to the followers here. >> translator: trance hfrance h republic, a new president, this is a choice. francois hollande is the president of france and must be respected. >> reporter: and while the crowd here is thinning out, one of the things that sarkoz
of the chinese dissident chen who the government there can travel for a travel permit to go to the united states to study. before secretary of state hillary clinton worked tout and this is what romney had to say and he had been turned over to the chinese without protection. >> it is a dave shame for the obama administration. >> question: did governor over react in the middle of the diplomatic chrisis? >> i don't think so. it is what we are dealing with in china. we know we are dealing with people who are parinoid and control freaks and a totalitarian system. they control the wors on the internet and who visits him in jail or i am sorry, in the hospital. these are the things we are deal. and second there is a propensity that the administration seems to have to have an unwillingness to enforce american values. we saw that in 2009 in the green revolution in iran and we see it in china that the administration looked reluctant to enforce the defensive of the united states of human rights and respect for huhan rights and that is troubling. i am not sure why the administration has a propensity to feel
as a result of the economy. the unemployment rate in the united states is around 8% and in france, it is 10%. they have to find a way to get the euro zone out of this mountain of debt. the difference between sarkozy and hollande is that sarkozy and the german chancellor came to a consensus to cut spending. but hoeland says we need a growth plan. and that sounds good but you have to find money somewhere. what are you going to do? raise taxes? get money from the central bank? all of those are details that need to be hammered out. and uncertainty is an issue for markets including the u.s. markets, don. >> and the interesting thing. the americans want to know what about me? so it will affect the u.s. markets. but obviously when people went to the polls to vote in france they weren't thinking about the world economy or the european economy or the euro zone. they wanted their own country with those measures they don't like. that's what they went to vote on. >> look, you know what strikes me is i live in the u.s. and reporting on the french election and when i asked ordinary french people what is
of the united states. it's a pleasure to welcome up as you know, the national archives charged with preserving and providing access to our nation's most important documents. the records we safeguard are part of the backbone of our democracy. important pieces of the story of the american journey. they contain accounts of heroism and tragedy, of moments of pride and moments of shame. of sacrifices that men and women have made to defend our country and to extend basic human rights to all of our citizens. this library and 12 others like it around the country, contain the records of the presidents, dating back to 1929. when herbert hoofer lived in the white house. part of the national archives' vast holdings that tell the story of america. our holdings also include the charters of freedom, declaration of independence, the constitution, and the bill of rights, located in the rotunda of our main building in washington. but we also have 12 billion more pages of documents, not to mention millions of photographs, charts, and billions of electronic records and artifacts that are part of the national arch
in yemen. he had been indicted in the united states on 50 terrorism counts. the fbi had offered a $5 million reward for his capture. >>> a deadly day for troops in afghanistan. a gunman dressed in an afghan army uniform shot and killed a nato service member before being killed by coalition forces. and in another province, a roadside bomb exploded killing one american and wounding two others. the explosion hit a vehicle carrying sufficient troops near an outpost close to the pakistan border. >>> the lawyer for 9/11 mastermind khalid shaikh mohammed says the military justice system is rigged, so he can't do his job. mohammed and four defendants were arraigned saturday in guantanamo bay, cuba. the hearing dragged out for 13 hours as the five accused conspirators did everything in their power to defy the court. despite the protests, the military's chief prosecutor says the trial will be fair and just. >> for those who lost family or friends on september 11th, or who were injured in the attacks, no words are adequate for this moment. but know that however long the journey, and this arraig
of 1864. the united states army left a large amount of baggage and equipage, and the family went out and recovered this. amongst it were two -- two -- civil war tents. one of those tents was a sibley tent. designed by henry hawkins sibley based on a plains indian teepee pattern. the family had had these tents in their possession since recovering at that point in time. one of them's a wall tent and then this is the sibley tent. remarkably, it's now known there are only two sibley tents in the american civil war in existence in the world. one in each hemisphere of mother earth. this one is in our hemisphere, and in possession of the american people now. this tent, recent negotiations with smithsonian institute, will be traveling to washington for potential display at the national african-american museum and the civil war exhibit of the african-american experience in the civil war. so that we're excited about that. the conservation and the expedition of tents is very difficult, they're quite large. this is a huge tent, and they got all kinds of issues on their display, because they're h
in this election. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [cheers and applause] >> gov. romney is a patriotic american. he has raised a wonderful family and has much to be proud of it. he has run a large financial firm and he has run a state. i think he has learned the wrong lessons from these experiences. he sincerely believes that the ceos and will the investors liked him make money, the rest of us will automatically prosper as well. when a woman in iowa shares a story about her financial struggles, he responded with the economic theory. he told her our productivity equals our income. let me tell the virginia, the problem with our economy is not that the american people are not productive enough. you have never been working harder in your lives. you are working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now, the challenge we have faced for over a decade is that harder work has not led to higher incomes. bigger profits of not lead to better jobs. gov. romney does not seem to get that. he does not seem to understand maximizing profits by whatever
, and -- and eleanor is like, no, we must defend the united states. we cannot have our dirty laundry aired, and so part of that was the pushback in terms of burying this petition deep within the bowels of the u.n., but it was also in sending the signal to the naacp that all of this international stuff about human rights was not going to be tolerated, particularly in terms of human rights in the united states. we can talk about human rights that the polls aren't able to have democracy. we can talk about human rights that the east germans don't have freedom of speech, but we cannot talk about human rights in terms of what's happening in the united states, and so she resigned from the board of directors of the naacp, and it took all of walter white's efforts. i liken it to almost doing a james brown please, please, please. >> don't go. >> don't go. >> eleanor, please, don't go. >> yeah. that's what i mean about your allies can only take you so far. there are things that she could do. there were things she could not do and would not do and the naacp needed to understand that as it was crafting its strategy
plotting attacks in the west including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard park had alarm bells ringing at the white house level, but, again, at that point, when we go back and look, the administration at that point was focused on things like the balcans and fires elsewhere. >> host: in the national security arena. now, you talk about this wave of al-qaeda violence, and then they get beaten back. sometimes, because of their own actions, what caused the kind of temporary defeat the first time? was it our launch on afghanistan? >> guest: well, actually, it's about the reverse of the coin we just outlined. they lost the sanctuary in afghanistan so the host they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown, and in addition to that, we saw a u.s. approach that was focused mostly on services, the cia, the range of other intelligence services, nsa, geospatial, and then in special operational forces targeting in afghanistan and then in pakistan and other locations. >> host: you're talking about in 2001, how the u.s. fought back by sending in cia and special force
aliens returning to the united states. >> heather: jaw dropping video of an unprovoked attack on an elderly woman by a pit bulls. they are inherently dangerous animals and the ruling could impact owners of every breed of dog. >> gregg: fox news alert. the numbers are in. voters in france electing their first socialist president in two decades, francoise hollande. minutes after the polls closed. nicolas sarkozy admitted defeat. greg palkot is following it from paris with the latest. >> reporter: gregg, it was tight according to projections, only about 51% to 49% but socialist candidate francoise hollande did it beating nicolas sarkozy. we in the crowd at the very moment in front of socialist headquarters when the projections announced. take a look at what we heard and what we saw. >> it's an incredible town here. we are here on the left bank of paris after years in the political wasteland, supporters of the socialist party of francoise hollande, word has come out through the survey and polls that their man has one. listen to the crowd now. its wild scene. >> i love francoise. i
to the united states to study. before, secretary of state clinton worked out this apparent deal with the beijing government mitt romney weighed in and here is what he had to say about the cheng case and what at that point seemed to be the fact that he had been turned over to the chinese without any protections. >> this is a dark day for freedom and it is a day of seam for the obama administration. >> question, did governor romney overrehe act in the middle of a diplomatic crisis? >> i don't think so. first of all, i think it crisis is a reminder of what we are dealing with in china and we hope there are reformers in that government pushing for a more open system. what we though we are dealing with now are people that are paranoid and control freaks in a totaltarrian system. they control everything from the words you have search for on the internet and who gets to visit this gentleman when was in the hospital. secondly there is the prospencity that the administration seems to have of an unwillingness to forcefully assert america's values. we saw that tragically in 2009 in the green revolution in
, and the united states markets to follow suit. although there has been considerable expectation as we've watched the story unfold in france that it would lead to this result, and cast some cloud over the efforts to inact austerity measures. >> these measures are being driven largely by the americans. is this creating a ripple across europe? >> reporter: you are seeing a pushback against that, you're seeing it in the united states kingdom as well who is in a recession. in the united states we've seen a slight diminution of the republican zeal for public cuts. and you can expect democrats and president obama to go hard after them in the election on medicare and social security. the republican point of view, they've got to hope that the anti-incumbent message sent to sarkozy will be repeated in november. >>> let's talk about this country, exactly six months until our election day. this weekend, president obama officially kicked off his campaign, with rallies in a pair of swing states. though a lot of folks are quick to point out what sure has looked like campaigning from the president for months no
, and this is what is framing and steeling these veterans then coming back to the united states determined that the u.s. will live up to what is called its vaunted democracy, will live up to its bill of rights. these veterans were not playing. and when you begin to think about some of the key leaders in the civil rights movement, these are black veterans coming out of the second world war. >> david? >> well, i'd go to president truman right away i think because carol understands that international perspective so much better than i ever would, but president truman i think did issue the executive order in 1948 for two basic reasons. one was his own personal conviction. the other was he was in the fight of his life for an election. and he issues it on july 26th, 1948, and calculation of black votes in that is apparent. i don't mean that's the only motivation. these are complicated people, eisenhower and truman, and they do things for multiple reasons. and i think from -- from an african-american perspective, all of these guys don't quite get it sometimes, but they still were in a political context where
and they conclude that the 4 percent of priests in the united states during the past 60 years yourself sexually violated a minor. that means 96 percent and did not wish also compare that to other groups that have access to children. greaser clergy or pastors are so forth with other religious traditions of public-school teachers and soccer coaches and a clearly have found not like to their studies but other cities to the sexual abuse tragically exists in any institution where you have an adult interaction with children. what we need to do is keep kids safe and do everything we can to keep the kid save and can do this their policies and procedures that are in place now with the u.s. council of catholic bishops but also the group's doing a better job. the good news is that the percentage of children being abused in recent years is much lower than in the past. >>> all of these procedures and policies are overseen by people that are objective and not to put these things in place. so this is really authentic prevention. >>> i think it's really good the glitches everybody doing their job well. the p
started. we are fired up. we are ready to go. we will remind the world why the united states of america is the greatest nation on earth. thank you. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. [cheers and applause] ♪ [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ [cheers and applause] ♪ >> sunday on washington journal, michael scheuer joins us. then trey grayson will join us to talk about how president obama has widened the gap with you to voters. washington journal every morning at 7:00 eastern on c-span. the case of chinese activist chen who spoke by phone during the hearing. >> i am in fear of my other family member's lives. we have installed seven video cameras. even an electric fence. he said those security officers -- they basically said, we want to see what else the can do. >> watch the entire hearing online at the c-span video library. >> the libertarian party earlier today elected gary johnson as their nominee an las vegas. he said his goal was to reach 15% in the polls to qualify for the debate
american garden in the united states. it is a historical japanese- style garden, originally billed as a village for the 1894 midwinter international exposition. after the exposition, a japanese-american partner along with john mclaren converted the exhibition into a permanent park. he over saw the building as the teagarden and was the official caretaker from -- until 1925. he requested the people of japan 1000 flooring cherry trees to be imported and other plants and birds and goldfish. his family lived in the garden until 1942. when under executive order 906, he was forced to relocate to an internment camp with thousands of other japanese american families. this barden was renamed the oriental tea garden and it fell into a state of disrepair. in the 1950's, we had moved forward and the rec and park renamed it the japanese tea garden. the first concessionaire was jack -- who many here had the incredible opportunity to honor. and we're very incredibly pleased to be planning -- planting a cherry tree from the consul general. the cherry blossom tree planting has become a tradition tha
bring it back to the united states. nobody knows what's coming up in 2013. is there going to be a giant fiscal tightening with the bush tax cuts ending? with the temporary wage subsidies ending and other things? i don't think anybody knows. a lot of uncertainty. >> in terms of the tax situation in the united states, if we see the bush tax cuts expire, you've got capital gains taxes going up to, i don't know, 25%. dividend taxes up from 16% all the way to 43%. if that happens, do you think we get a market sell-off? >> oh, absolutely. i think that is not likely to happen. that's really jumping off a fiscal cliff. if it happened in the context of some great reform, like bowl simpson or something that gets rid of a lot of deduction, keeps the rates low, or raises them a little for the wealthiest taxpayers, but if we get a real reform, that could help the market. we don't know what's coming in 2013. >> we've seen a pretty strong earning season in the meantime. 60% of companies are looking at growth of more than 7%, better than the overall economy. is it a disconnect that corporate america is
to motivate refugees to succeed in the united states. programs. they come from all over africa, asia and the middle east. the families have endured the same struggles. when they realize that, they become like brothers and sisters. soccer gives confidence, it makes them feel like they belong and it's just fun. we use soccer as a hook and we have them in our education program. we try to get them on to college. >> we're helping to find friends and teach me how to speak english. now it's a fun life. >> the families sacrifice everything for their kids to have a better life. if we can do anything to help them, it's my honor. >> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. thank you for joining us. let me update you. arraignment today for five of the men accused of plotting the 9/11 attacks, including khalid sheikh muhammad. >>> race to the white house. president obama held his first two official campaign rallies today in ohio and another in virginia. >>> two must-win battleground states for obama and mitt romney. the president highlighted his accomplishments but cold crowds in both states that th
overseas trip for francois hollande if he is elected this evening will be to the united states. there is a nato summit and a g8 summit that are happening in washington and chicago in just a few weeks. his first will be to berlin because, of course, the franco-german friendship is crucial, and the second will be to the united states if he is elected. that's when he will get to meet barack obama, the u.s. president. the one tiny issue between france and the u.s. were there. not exactly on the same page. if it's francois hollande, afghanistan -- he said he wants to withdraw all french troops from afghanistan by the end of this year. nicolas sarkozy, the incumbent has said he will wait until next year. randy. >> it has been an interesting race. things got pretty heated in a debate last week with sarkozy calling hollande a liar. >> reporter: well, what happened is that, yes, it did become personal. you don't feel that these two men like each other on a personal level. it got a bit heated when sarkozy kept using the word lie, and that's where francois hollande said why do you keep us
was the united states. the living room was mexico. walter cronkite was the ambassador to both countries. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the colberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation, a john and holly guf charitable fund. the clement foundation, park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb albert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audrey rappaport foundation, the john d. and katherine t. mcarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. and gumowitz, the hkh foundation, barbara g. fleishmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we are your retirement company. >> welcome. there is no stretch of territory in the world quite like the
there people who came in early? yes. were the united states deputy marshal whose took advantage of the opportunity? yes. were there court says cases? yes, they would drag on almost a decade. the laissez-faire did not work well. yes, the fastest riders. those would be the cowboys had trained mustangs, knew the territory because they'd been driving cattle across the land. the farmers who may have been the pillars of their community, if they were in a wagon, had a family, maybe they did not get land. so both of those philosophies of government and social evolution were only partially true, but, nevertheless, that day, part of the american west was settled. well, after 1889, other parts of the indian territory were taken away from indian tribes and put into the public domain. they call it the allotment process. so the federal government would negotiate with the sacken fox and the potawatomi. others picked off. biggest of the land run, cherokee in northern oklahoma just on the kansas border was opened by land run. 100,000 people made that run. 1901, the last of the real big ones. the
. throughout the united states, they were looking for cases that could get into the supreme court. so my mom had just graduated from college in 1945, and she was valedictorian from her class from high school. she was an honor student at langston university. the president of the local naacp knew my family. my mom happened to be in the room when they were discussing it. so she agreed to be the plaintiff. they went and applied for admission on january the 14th, 1946. and she was rejected. they began the legal process. that legal process took from then until january of 1948, two years, to actually work itself through the legal process. the case was first started in norman, oklahoma at the county level, and she lost there, tan was appealed to oklahoma supreme court where she lost there. and then they appealed that to the united states supreme court. the supreme court ruled unanimously that she should have that opportunity in oklahoma. my mom was real excited about that, she was at the supreme court when they had the arguments. and so she came back to oklahoma, real excited, thinking she was getti
president of the united states. i hope you will give me your votes. thank you so much. [cheers and applause] [background conversations] >> i guess come to order was the magic word. so based on the prior motion that was passed to dispense with the reading of the vote totals from each of the delegation chairs we will now close the--we will now post the results on the screen for everybody to see. >> thank you. you will never regret this. i haven't been so excited about anything that i can think of. the work is now beginning. we have the very best candidate i can think of to lead this party ticket, and i'm going to do my party a--my part as well. however, let me tell you my strategy. we need everyone in this room to take this election personally. we need you to get our information, to pass it around to your circle of friends, your your emails, your discussions, your lunch clubs, whatever it is, and tell them to take it personally as well. when that happens we will start polling. we're now about 7% with governor johnson. we're going to start polling around 12%, 15%, 18%. you know what happens th
the borderlands between the united states and mexico. a vast swath of terrain, a long and tortured history and an endless stream of humanity both separate and join our two countries. it's as complex a coupling as you will find anywhere. on the gulf of mexico, the border runs along the rio grande river to intersect with the continental divide where it turns toward tijuana and san diego on the pacific ocean. 1,969 miles snaking through desert and desolation. dividing towns and cities. marked now by stretches of steel and concrete fence, infrared cameras and sensors, natural guardsmen and border patrol agents. nearly 100 million people cross this border every year one way or another. one day in may, 11 years ago, 26 mexican men set out across the murderous stretch of desert known as the devil's highway. heading for arizona. and hopefully for work. 12 of them made it. 14 were scorched alive by the torrid sun. their story became a stunning work by the author luis alberto arraya. no one writes more tragically about the border culture than the son of a mexican father and anglo mother. born in tij
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 225 (some duplicates have been removed)